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Two people a day convicted of sexual abuse against children

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Friday, 24 July 2015 13:11 Written by Christian Berg

Two people a day convicted of sexual abuse against children                       
The NSPCC announced that on average two people are being convicted of child abuse image crimes every day. Christian Berg, CEO and founder of NetClean comments on the fundamental misunderstanding of the scale of the problem.

Christian Berg, CEO and founder of NetClean




Despite Cameron’s comments on the 'national threat’ of child sexual abuse, and a renewed commitment to tackling it, there is still a fundamental misunderstanding of the scope of this problem and the means by which it can be tackled. The number of people and volume of material involved in child sexual abuse crimes is overwhelming. British, and international law enforcement simply doesn’t have the numbers to deal with this on a case-by-case basis. It requires the action of millions, to protect communities and the refusal to stand idly by.


Blocking and removing the content is one thing, but it’s only tackling the surface symptoms of a much deeper problem. We must tackle the industry of child sexual abuse at the root. It is not enough to simply block and remove reported images, we must proactively seek out those exchanging this content in order to identify victims and stop abusers. The technology to do this does exist, and must be used. But it takes businesses, individuals and the gatekeepers of online infrastructure to take action.


Policing the Internet, like the rest of the world, is a hard thing to do. No single entity controls the Internet, and rightly so. As such it requires each of us to take responsibility for our portion, to ensure our networks, our communities, our devices cannot be used to perpetuate the suffering of victims of child sexual abuse. 


It is a common misconception that viewing images containing child sexual abuse is not a significant crime. In some ways viewers of this content are just as harmful as the abusers themselves. Individuals who collect, view and share images and don’t actually participate in abuse are creating the demand that fuels this industry, and their appetite is creating more victims.


Methods of viewing and sharing this kind of content are constantly evolving and increasingly we are seeing individuals abusing a position of trust that allow them access to children. It is time the government treated child sexual abuse with the severity as they would other serious crimes. This is too important an issue to allow future generations to ignore. Protection is important, but prevention is the cure.”


 




        






 
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