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Digital Forensics in Law Enforcement

The State of Digital Forensics in Law Enforcement

Around the world, law enforcement processes and procedures for digital evidence have their differences – and their similarities. By Christa Miller.


No police force can do without the ability to handle digital evidence, which is now present at virtually every crime scene. However, worldwide, not all police forces are adequately staffed, trained or equipped to collect much less analyse computers, cell phones, wireless devices, or cloud-stored data.


Both high-tech crime investigators and the organizations that support them seek to change this attitude. For example, projects such as the National Repository of Digital Forensic Intelligence (NRDFI), a joint effort between the US Defence Department Cyber Crime Centre and Oklahoma State University, brings together investigators from Australia, Canada, England and New Zealand.


At INTERPOL, meanwhile, “working parties” meet regularly to discuss the impact of digital evidence on investigators in four major regions: Europe, Africa, Asia-South Pacific, and Latin America. (While Interpol’s website reflects a 2007 meeting of an intended North Africa/Middle East Working Party, no other information exists about it.)


A look at each working party’s emphasis indicates the specific challenges faced by law enforcement in those regions. In the Western European countries which comprise Europe’s working party, as well as in the Asia-South Pacific region, emphasis is on training and information sharing, including international cooperation.


IIn Africa and Latin America, on the other hand, working parties are focused more on creating awareness and building best practices guidelines, at the same time that they promote international cooperation.


Following is a more in-depth analysis of these regions plus North America; including specific example countries… see issue 4 for the rest of this article - subscribe now!


The full article appears in Issue 4 of Digital Forensics Magazine, published 1st Aug 2010. You must log in with a valid subscription to read on...


 
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