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Proactive Computer Forensics

Written by DFM team



Proactive Computer Forensics – Preparing for Search & Seizure 

Scott Zimmerman

In Scott's final article in the series, he examines Search & Seizure procedures used by US Federal LE organizations and by international organizations. 

The practice of computer forensics has become more economically feasible in recent years and some larger organizations have begun to add internal computer crime investigation personnel to their rosters.  Similarly, a growing number of commercial companies offer forensic services to other businesses and to governments. These services often include data recovery from erased or physically damaged media, in-house incident response and litigation support, such as providing expert witnesses.  


However, a great amount of computer crime investigation experience lies with Law Enforcement (LE) organizations.  The goal of this article is to provide non-LE personnel with the guidelines they need to gather evidence and conduct forensic examinations in accordance with law enforcement standards.  What better way to meet these standards than to follow the same procedures used by law enforcement?


Search & Seizure – How to Search and What to Seize

By answering a series of questions, individuals involved in an investigation can plan their approach to collecting evidence.  The context is computer crime investigation and as such the role of a given computer at the scene will fall into one of four broad categories:


  • Was the computer itself the objective of the crime?  If the perpetrator broke into a facility and stole the computer, the computer would be the objective.
  • Was the computer a tool used to commit the offense?  If the perpetrator used his home computer to compromise an online banking site, the site would be the objective; the computer would be a tool.
  • Is the computer only indirectly related to the incident?  Picture a suspect who generated false credit reports and credit card numbers on his desktop machine and sold the bogus information to people who were laundering money.  The suspect kept track of what he sold, to whom, using an accounting software package installed on a laptop. The credit reports and card numbers would be the objective; the desktop machine would be the tool; the laptop would be indirectly related to the crime.
  • Was the computer used for multiple tasks or stages of the crime?  In the example above, if the suspect generated false credit information on the same laptop he used to record his financial records, the laptop would have been used as a tool and as a storage device.  It would then be both directly and indirectly related to the crime.


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Coming up in the Next issue of Digital Forensics Magazine

Coming up in Issue 34 on sale from February 2018:


Device Forensics in the Internet of Things

As more businesses and consumers adopt IoT devices, privacy violations and cyber-attacks by malicious actors will become commonplace due to the insecure IoT infrastructure. Read More »

Data Destruction In Current Hard Disks & Data Destruction Techniques

Data destruction is a process traditionally applied using physical techniques, aiming at the completely destruction of the hard disk, however, there is an increasing interest in the use of logical techniques for data destruction, that allow reusing the physical device. Read More »

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Faster Searching For Known Illegal Content

Cryptographic (“MD5”) hash searching for known illegal material is one of the most thorough methods of digital forensic investigation. However, the technique is hampered by the ever-increasing size of media being examined, and the size of the hash list being searched. Read More »

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