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Cellebrite introduces new UFED mobile forensics software to manage how investigators extract mobile data

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Tuesday, 29 April 2014 21:13 Written by DFM News

Cellebrite, the leading developer and provider of mobile data forensic solutions, has released new software for its Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED) that allows forensic lab administrators to enforce policies around the manner and circumstances under which investigators extract mobile device data.

“UFED Permission Management was developed in response to demand for more evenly distributed mobile forensics capabilities across government and corporate organisations,” said Ron Serber, Cellebrite Corporate Co-CEO. “However, not every user has the right or the need to bypass a user lock, access certain types of data, or perform a deep extraction and analysis. By extending basic mobile evidence collection and reporting capabilities to those responsible for proving minor offences or corporate policy violations, but also limiting those capabilities, forensic lab administrators can accelerate investigations while preserving privacy and due process protections.”

Released as part of the UFED 3.0 version, UFED Permission Management offers administrative support at any extraction level: logical, file system or physical. It enables administrators to create user profiles and assign data extraction permissions according to predefined standard operating procedures (SOPs) or other internal policies. Administrators can therefore use the solution to manage forensic lab personnel, or to extend mobile data extraction capabilities to a broader field of users on a “right to know, need to know” basis—reducing the risk of their accessing private data beyond the scope of their legal authority.

UFED Permission Management enables administrators to enforce their organisation’s SOPs or policies, which may require end users to have achieved a certain level of competency, training and/or certification in mobile data collection. End user permissions may also be based upon a role they fulfill, such as general evidence collection specialist, or types of incidents they respond to.

As a result, users who have access to UFED mobile data extraction platforms may have their permission limited to perform only certain types of extractions—for instance, to acquire only existing, but not deleted, data from a mobile device—and within that data set, only certain data, such as call logs and text messages but not images or videos. The permission management function therefore helps users better manage the vast array of data that is possible to extract with UFED technology.

UFED Permission Management is part of a set of features developed within UFED 3.0 that make mobile evidence identification and collection more efficient for both lab and field personnel. The other features include a more streamlined evidence collection workflow interface, which can automatically detect the device to be extracted, and a new mobile app, UFED Phone Detective, available for iOS and Android devices.

 
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